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conditions pursuant to section of the Gaming and Wagering Commission Act (WA) and regulation 36A of the Gaming and Wagering.


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regulates community gaming activities under the Gaming and Wagering Commission Act (WA). A permit is required to raise funds from gaming activities.


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gaming and wagering commission act 1987

Let us be a little bit more respectful of the concerns being raised. I have been told that the impact on the sale price of the TAB will be about three to four per cent. Gambling addiction is one of the main drivers of homelessness. It is true that a lot of concerns that have been raised are written in a similar way because effectively these organisations feel as though they only had the opportunity to express their concerns quite late in the piece. The Cancer Council actually said that in its experience problem gambling leads to poorer health outcomes. With respect to the Treasurer, it is not his place to dictate how this Council chooses to respond to legislation. He made the comment that there had even been correspondence received from the Cancer Council saying that gambling caused cancer. Obviously, we could never arrive at a definitive amount, because we do not really even know how much the TAB will sell for. I just want to call that out and say what a load of nonsense it is. The letter said —. The reason those additional revenue streams will come through is that more and more people will spend money on gambling, and potentially on addictive electronic gambling. I suppose the first thing I would say to members is that I realise they have a wide variety of views about what it means to include Trackside in this legislation. It is a recognition from those people who are so vehemently opposed that we do not want pokies here in Western Australia and that pokies have had a highly detrimental impact in the states where they exist. I understand why people are so vehemently opposed to pokies and want to make sure that we never, ever go down that path. These organisations are of the view that they were not appropriately consulted and did not fully understand the implications of what was being proposed, at the same time that the racing industry was being consulted. On the face of it, our position on this bill might have been entirely different had Trackside not been part of the legislation. Quite frankly, pokies have also ruined a lot of pubs and clubs, which can now be pretty inhospitable to walk into. That is very different from saying that gambling is a carcinogen. The government is proposing to introduce something that will potentially cause enormous harm to individuals. I would like to clarify the record on that, because that is not what the Cancer Council said when it wrote to express its concern about this. As has certainly been relayed to me, they do not feel that they were adequately warned through this consultation process with the racing industry of the sorts of changes proposed here. It has now been well canvassed in this second reading debate that the government has had a complete change of heart, and suddenly Trackside is now apparently not so much of an issue. The suggestion has been put to me— rather wryly—that one of the reasons we should support Trackside is that it would be a good substitute for those people who are concerned about the treatment of animals in horseracing. I reiterate that the Greens are not opposed as such to the sale of the TAB. I also want to respond to another comment the minister made in response to a question put at clause 1. It goes on to make a number of informed points about the correlation between poor health outcomes and problem gambling. Going back to the Cancer Council, I put on the record some of the comments it has made. We should be opposed, because they have such a detrimental impact on individuals and communities, and are also culturally detrimental to places where people like to congregate. It said there is a direct link between gambling and negative health outcomes, including increased risk of chronic cancers. I note also the spurious distinction people have tried to make between electronic gaming and keno. It is designed to raise endorphins so that people just keep at it and keep trying. I am concerned about the effect on the services that will need to be provided for problem gambling. I thought I would make it clear from the outset that the contribution I am about to make is all part of the same debate; I do not intend to revisit it with every proposed amendment. Let us be clear about what it is. However, it is very clear that the community sector is not of the view that it was well aware of the implications of what was to be included in the sale of the TAB. We know that poor health outcomes generally can be a precursor to cancer. I am talking about a significant number of organisations that deal with people within our community who are the most vulnerable and who end up with a range of problems. I want to pick up on some of the other arguments that have been put forward. The industry will be given a flat 35 per cent of the overall sale price, as well as the attraction of ongoing revenue streams. People have raised concerns that Trackside is problematic on two levels. However, I am saddened that effectively, in order to undertake that review, we run the risk that problem gambling will have escalated in that time. I want to make a couple of points on that. Pokies are associated with higher rates of poor health amongst people who, unfortunately, become problem gamblers. However, I note that no-one is proposing to introduce a greyhound Trackside so that the greyhound racing industry can be banned. I am very pleased that an amendment was successfully passed in the other place to provide for a review of this legislation after three years, to look specifically at the impact of Trackside, should that continue in its current form at the current TAB. However, I hope that the amount of money we are talking about is not such that the government will need to abandon the entire sale. I think it is really important that we are very careful when we make these sorts of statements and start disparaging these highly reputable organisations, many of which people in this chamber will go out of their way to be associated with, meet with, take advice from and be involved with. People experiencing homelessness are more at risk of chronic diseases such as cancer. There is an option to expand the range of electronic gambling options, and that could potentially include pokies; that is what this legislation does, and I do not think we should try to pretend otherwise. Trackside is not intended to replace live animal racing. I will not cease putting forward amendments that I believe are important simply because that threat has been made. There is a higher per capita percentage of gambling and problem gambling in states with pokies. I reiterate that I would be happy if greyhound racing were banned. The amendment on the supplementary notice paper to delete the lines is one of a number of amendments, all of which are meant to effect the same outcome. I do not think that the intention of introducing Trackside is that it will reduce the level of horseracing in particular. I listened intently to the questions asked by Hon Nick Goiran and I was left even more concerned after hearing the answers. This can have negative consequences across the whole cancer spectrum—from prevention and diagnosis, to treatment, access to support services and palliative care. I agree with their concerns. Electronic gaming is by its very nature designed to be addictive; that is how people make money from it. For a number of years the racing industry was consulted on a number of elements of the proposed sale of the TAB. It is a cute argument, but it is pretty disingenuous. I recognise the huge appeal for the racing industry in maximising the profit that will ultimately be available from the sale. That is well illustrated in all the evidence and data, and public health associations have talked about this as well. Gambling can put people into a cycle of disadvantage, further exacerbating their social and thereby health outcomes. I do not intend to revisit that debate, but I particularly note his concern that four of the key letters of support were very similar and looked as though they had almost come from a template letter.

Resumed from 21 August. It is problematic to try to argue that https://lesnoy-dvor44.ru/games/money-game-casino.html gaming has no connection with pokies whatsoever.

Clearly, I am responding to the concerns raised by the community sector, and it is not a surprise for anybody in this chamber to know that I work very closely with these organisations and take the issues they raise and bring to my attention very seriously.

That is the nature of electronic gaming. I think that these concerns are significant. The Cancer Council did not say that. It is potentially the thin end of the wedge; that is, if we introduce this form of electronic gambling, what restrictions will there be on introducing other forms of electronic gambling in the future?

One of the most emphatic arguments put forward was games ps3 these simulated races are not pokies—that we are absolutely not introducing pokies.

I am greatly concerned about that and I do not feel that I can, in good conscience, stand here and pass a piece of legislation that will effectively change the landscape of electronic gambling in this state so that it is no longer limited only to the casino but will be broadly available in the regions and in suburbia.

There are differing ideas about how much such a removal would impact on the price. I ask that that take place before Hon Alison Xamon asks her question. It does not feel as though the door is going to be closed appropriately, other than through gaming and wagering commission act 1987 verbal undertaking by the government that it might not be interested in expanding electronic gaming.

Trackside is recognised as being a problem in its own right, and I will talk a little more about that in a moment. The intention of Trackside is to ensure that more gambling is conducted through the TAB.

The previous government contemplated allowing keno and was smashed for it by the opposition; the opposition also at that point equated keno with Trackside. I also point out that I have noticed that one minister from the other place took gaming and wagering commission act 1987 upon himself to suggest that the concerns being raised were only being raised by me.

One of the things I have always really liked about Western Australia is that if I compare walking into a pub here—which I am quite happy to do, frequently! People have responded vehemently to concerns raised by the community sector that it will potentially lead to a pokies culture.

I stress from the outset that these organisations do not feel that they have been consulted, so this is very last minute for them.

I note that that was considered to be an indication of a shared view among those racing industry groups about how those decisions were made. I understand that. On behalf of the Greens, I indicate that we are very concerned about the decision that has been made to include within the capacity to sell the TAB the introduction of simulated electronic racing.

Let us talk about those revenue streams. In this instance, all those groups have expressed specific concern about problem gambling and about how the changes proposed in this bill will adversely impact on our community.

We have seen an almost last-minute range of concerns about the adverse impacts on the community from the introduction of electronic gaming in our suburbs and regions. My argument is that I would rather take a lower amount from the sale of the TAB, and ensure that in our treatment of electronic gaming it is business as usual.

Another thing to note is that there is nothing in this legislation that would mean Trackside is the only electronic gambling available. We believe an argument can be made that government does not need to be in the business of gambling.

I want to say something about the value of the TAB, which is also likely to be affected by this legislation.

However, if the government needs to invest in more services to support people who unfortunately are caught in the cycle of problem gambling, that will mitigate the overall profit gaming and wagering commission act 1987 the sale of the TAB.

I want to respond in particular to a comment by the minister, which sounded disparaging but which I am sure the minister did not mean because I know he works with many of these organisations and holds them in high regard.

I am disappointed that we will need a review in three years to assess how much harm we have managed to wreak on the community with the introduction of Trackside.

I want to make it clear: I am under no illusion that if we were to remove the capacity for electronic gaming and Trackside from this legislation, it would mean that the TAB would be sold for a lower price. I make that comment because we are in a similar situation here.